Discipline vs. scheduling

One of the best statements I’ve read on developer discipline (which for me includes testing, documentation etc) came from Robert C. Martin:

“You know what you believe by observing yourself in a crisis. If in a crisis you follow your disciplines, then you truly believe in those disciplines. On the other hand, if you change your behaviour in a crisis, then you don’t truly believe in your normal behaviour” (from Chapter 11 in the Clean Coder)

There’s a slight subtlety here, in that you can sometimes gain time by dropping process, but this gain quickly evaporates as technical debt builds up. And, if you believe in these disciplines, you will schedule time to make up for this. As Martin explains:

“If you follow the discipline of Test Driven Development in non-crisis times but abandon it during a crisis, then you don’t really trust that TDD is helpful. If you keep your code clean during normal times but make messes in a crisis, then you don’t really believe that messes slow you down. If you pair in a crisis but don’t normally pair, then you believe pairing is more efficient than non-pairing. Choose disciplines that you feel comfortable following in a crisis. Then follow them all the time. Following these disciplines is the best way to avoid getting into a crisis.”

Discipline is often abandoned due to scheduling pressure. Martin discusses how to respond to such pressure in the second chapter of the Clean Coder. Developers often give an estimate only to be pressured to produce the output more quickly. The temptation is to give in to this pressure and promise to “try”. This is dangerous:

“If you are not holding back some energy in reserve, if you don’t have a new plan, if you aren’t going to change your behavior, and if you are reasonably confident in your original estimate, then promising to try is fundamentally dishonest. You are lying. And you are probably doing it to save face and to avoid a confrontation.”

Overtime is one response to this, but it can easily spiral out of control, since this is one of the few places where leverage can be applied. It also suffers from diminishing returns. There is good evidence that working more than 40 hours a week over a long time is harmful to projects.

So how can projects speed up? By the time an unrealistic deadline has become solid, it’s usually too late. Deadlines are often particularly problematic in scrum. It takes time for a scrum team to settled into a cadence where their work-rate becomes predictable. If the scope and team size have been fixed, then there is no way to hit the deadline without distorting the process.

What should you do when you have an urgent deadline that looks unachievable? In such a situation, failure has happened before development begins. Most times, this is not recognised until the developers are at work – resulting in crunch time, and estimates made to fit the deadline. In such situations, the best thing to do is to deal with the current project as best you can; and to look at future projects, making sure that these are not being scheduled without a good idea of the development needed.

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