Category Archives: brightonjava

The Art of Running Meetings

I love this spoof advert, which I first saw back when you had to share your memes by email:

We are social animals, so meetings are an important part of our work. But they can also get in the way of work. I’ve known too many people who claimed to be more effective when they worked from home, or who worked early or late to ‘get things done’. Given how important meetings are, it’s worth spending time getting them right. Running effective meetings is a skill, and too often people don’t bother.

For me the following is essential for any meeting:

  • A clear summary of the meeting, so people can quickly work out if they need to attend (particularly if they see it on a shared calendar).
  • A goal – what do we want to get out of this meeting?
  • An agenda – what specific points are we discussing?
  • Pre-requisites – what should people read or do to prepare for the session?
  • Follow-up – after the meeting, a clear summary should be produced and preferably posted to a shared wiki. There should also be a list of action items, with each assigned to a specific individual.

A lot of work is needed around a meeting, but this is worth doing because meetings are expensive. Sometimes I think there should be a clock in the room, showing how much it has cost so far. A one hour meeting for seven people is taking up the equivalent of a person’s work for a day.

In his most recent video for Brigton Java/Silicon Brighton, James Stanier talked about running effective remote meetings:

James provides a great primer on meetings, as well as some useful points that I’d not considered before:

  • Recurring meetings should have a rolling agenda in a shared document which anyone can add to during the week.
  • The best meeting is one that does not need to happen, where people can resolve the issues without the need for synchronous time.
  • James also suggests ‘silent meetings’, allowing time for people to read relevant documents at the start of a meeting.
  • As well as a chair and a scribe, larger meetings can also use ‘spotters’ to identify people who have not been able to speak or to contribute.
  • James also suggests recording meetings to reduce the need for them to be synchronous. I don’t like listening to meeting recaps personally, preferring written summaries, but maybe I should try making space for other people’s preferences in meetings that I’m running.

As James says in his presentation, “synchronous time is special”. It’s worth investing some preparation to make sure it is used as well as possible.

James Stanier’s Remote Asynchronous Working Talks

Brighton Java has been on hiatus during the pandemic. A lot of groups have gone online, but I was reluctant to do that, since most technical jobs already involve too many video calls these days. There is a lot of excellent material online and, for me, local meet-ups are all about being there in person. I wanted to make sure that any remote event we ran justified people’s time and attention.

Our first event this year, in association with Silicon Brighton, is a series of remote and asynchronous talks by James Stanier. James has been a supporter of Brighton Java for a long time and recently published Become an effective software engineer. On Wednesdays in September he has been providing a series of talks on remote asynchronous working.

So far, the first three talks in the series of five have been posted onto Youtube:

  1. Positive & Negative Effects of the Pandemic on the Tech Industry
  2. The Distributed Working Mindset
  3. Staying Connected by Communicating Deliberately

In his first talk, James looked at the current situation, and how the pandemic has forced people into home working. While times are difficult there is a possibility for producing useful long-term change. Remote work is now more prevalent, and some companies are switching to be more flexible than before (Brandwatch, where James is SVP Engineering, has gone remote-first).

James divided the responses to remote work into three groups – those who wanted to be in an office full time, those who wanted to be remote at all times, and those who wanted a sustainable mix of the two. Companies that can be flexible to people’s needs (for example childcare and health) open up a wider pool of talent.

I worked remotely with ribot, mixing my time between home, office, hotels, client sites and airports. Since the pandemic, I’ve been at home only, and I can see a definite advantage to having a base office. But I have also collaborated successfully with entirely remote colleagues, some of whom I never met in person. I believe that flexibility is vital in the modern world.

James himself is fully remote, and his experiences with this led into his second talk, about The Remote Mindset. This is the idea that if one colleague is remote, then companies should behave as if all of them are. James looked at a number of strategies around this. One example here was meetings, and how, if anyone is remote then everyone should interact via screens so there is a level playing field.

The practise of ‘broadcasting’ is also worth encouraging. This is the idea of leaving a public written trace of all smaller group discussions, particular the reasons for any decisions made. This sort of asynchronicity removes the need to be present at specific times. Recording meeting and providing good documentation makes companies more resilient. For example, someone who is ill can catch up easily.

Something else James said, which should be done more is the use of ‘spotters’ in meetings, to draw out people who have not spoken. I also think more companies would benefit by looking at how to make more of the scrum ceremonies asynchronous. I’ve always found the timing of a daily stand-up to be a point of friction.

The third talk looked at Staying Connected through Deliberate Communication. One thing lost through remote working is spontaneous interaction, the serendipity of casual in-person conversations. It’s not just a case of adding a burden of socialising through zoom. (I’ve pretty much stopped all non-work video calls).

James’s suggestions here included setting up informal one-to-one mentoring, and he described how this had been done at Branchwatch. He also made a strong case for connection people (asynchronously) through their passions, whether cooking, pets or exercise. Apparently teams at Brandwatch are competing to cover the distance between the Brighton and Boston offices. James also suggests explicit agenda-free “coffee break” get-togethers as part of the work day.

One of the things I love about these talks is that their form matches with their message. James has allowed the audience to choose topics for future talks, as well as answering specific questions. Some of these have been very useful such as how to handle colleagues who don’t turn on video, or tools for technical white-boarding.

The fourth talk will be live on Wednesday afternoon, on the topic of managing remote meetings. If you would like a reminder about it, please check the Meetup Page.

Brighton Java 2020

We’ve just announced the first two events for Brighton Java in 2020. On Tuesday January 28th, we have a talk on Serialization Vulnerabilities in Java from Joe Beeton and sponsored by Amex.

The talk looks at how Java applications can be vulnerable to serialization attacks, and how they can be protected. The talk will be useful to Java developers of all experience levels. Joe has done some interesting work around this topic, which I’m looking forward to hearing more about.

In February, we have Luke Whiting talking on Kubernetes in the Data Center: Theory vs Reality. This talk will be a little different to the usual format. Luke will start with a talk he gave at the start of a project, following it up with the lessons learned in hindsight.

We’re also putting together future events, including a collaboration with Silicon Brighton and an exciting speaker for April. But we’re always on the lookout for new speakers, and welcome people of all levels – introductory talks on a topic are just as useful as expert sessions. If you’ve not spoken before, we’re happy to help you prepare. Either leave a comment, or email james@orbific.com

I’m also hoping to do some practical first steps sessions. The JVM eco-system feels more exciting than ever right now; but it’s sometimes hard to work out how to begin with new topics. Hopefully, we can provide a collaborative environment for this. More soon.

June’s Brighton Java – Alexa and CQRS

We had two speakers at Brighton Java this week. I was the support act, kicking off with an introductory talk on Alexa in Ten Minutes. I enjoyed putting together such a brisk technical presentation, which came to 34 slides. I managed to finish dead on time and had some interesting questions afterwards. The slides are online,  along with a video of the evening. I also took my Echo Dot along, so that Alexa could speak with me:

Some links from the talk:

The second presentation, from David Ellis, was about CQRS and event sourcing. It was very timely for me as I’m reviewing the design of a platform I’m working on.

CQRS stands for Command/Query Responsibility Separation and is the idea of using a different data model for reads and writes. One way of doing this is event sourcing, which records a system’s full history as a series of immutable events. These become an append-only system of record for the system (as well as a full audit). Representations of state can then be built from this (including in-memory where speed is needed). You can also produce representations of specific times – a form of time travel. David ran through the basics and showed how event-sourcing worked as a means for CQRS.

While I’ve read about CQRS and event sourcing before, it’s great to hear someone talking about it. It also amused me that David’s examples were “written in Scala so that they fit on the slides”.

Given that the talk was at Brandwatch, there was some good discussion afterwards about the possibility of using Kafka. I’ve also been wondering today about combining CQRS and REST and hope to research that next week.

So, all-in-all, a good evening. My talk seemed to go well, and I learnt about CQRS. Thanks, once again, to Brandwatch, who hosted the event, as well as providing drinks and pizza. Luke and Adina helped set up the night, with Luke doing an amazing job with the tech side of things, handling sound, streaming and technical gremlins.

A Day in the life of a Functional Programmer

I sometimes think I should have used a different name to Brighton Java. Maybe Brighton JVM would have been more appropriate. We’ve certainly had a wider range of talks than the name implies. But the name Brighton Java does seem to draw people in, and nobody complains about the eclectic selection of talks.

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Last Wednesday we welcomed back Richard Dallaway of Underscore Consulting, who spoke about a day in the life of a functional programmer (slides here, with notes here) The talk was intended to communicate some of the exciting concepts available in Scala

You don’t come away from a talk like this knowing how to work with Scala – but it gives a clear demonstration that there are other ways in which code can work. While Java has certainly added many features in recent years, the language is a far less interesting and expressive one than Scala. It’s also interesting to see the way Scala supports different approaches to a same problem – Java, by comparison, tends to be more prescriptive about how to write code.

For Richard, Scala works better for modelling some things better than Java’s class hierarchies – the talk worked as a good companion to Danielle’s talk the month before.

We’re hoping to start a Scala workshop as part of Brighton Java, based on Functional Brighton‘s Learn You a Haskell group. It looks like we will base the first sessions on Underscores Essential Scala book. More news on that soon.

It was a good meeting, sponsored by Brandwatch. As well as providing the venue and AV equipment, they supported us with a great abundance of pizza. Thank you!

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Speaking at Brighton Java on January 25th

I’m speaking at Brighton Java next week on How to Deploy Java Webapps the Hard Way. It’s currently fully booked, but it’s worth trying the waitlist. The talk looks at some of the issues I’ve written about on this blog, such as the complexities of even simple Java projects. I’ll also consider technical debt and how to cope when problems arise.

Java Web Development the Hard Way

Tools like Spring Boot now mean that you can produce a working service from a tweet’s worth of code. But too often rushing headlong into production can lead to problems later.

James Burt looks at the work needed to get a supportable Java service into production. Too often, in the hurry to release features, companies pile on technical debt until their code becomes unmanageable. How do you avoid getting into these situations? And what do you do if it’s already happened?

This talk will start with a simple Spring Boot service and look at the tools and techniques that should be added before going live, making a case for a slower, more sustainable pace of development. 

Brighton Java Coding Dojo

Coding Dojos are a way for developers to practise together and improve their skills. I first became aware of them through the sessions run by Tom and Joh at Future Platforms. Since then, I’ve run lunchtime sessions at Crunch and now we’re running them as part of Brighton Java.

What happens at a Coding Dojo

The coding dojo begins with a description of a problem. Developers then take turns pair-programming for five minutes each, with one as the driver (using the  keyboard) and the other as navigator (making suggestions). After five minutes, the navigator takes over as the driver and there is a new navigator. As the pairs work, they narrate what they are doing. The IDE screen is also projected so that everyone in the room can see it clearly.

Seeing other people code is good for picking up the different ways people work. As developers we see a lot of people’s code, but few companies offer a chance to see it being written. By changing the people working on the dojo code, we see how developers respond to existing code.

Coding Dojos typically feature the use of TDD. Test-driven development is one of those things that a lot of companies endorse, but few use properly. Trying to maintain a tight test-code-refactor cycle is much easier with an audience to act as a conscience!

At the end of the session, everyone takes a turn saying what went well, what went badly, and anything they’ve learned.

Why would I want to attend a Coding Dojo?

Whatever your exact job within programming, it’s vital to be comfortable with basic development. The structure of a coding dojo, with its focus on deliberate practise and review makes a good environment for learning. This is important for new Java developers, but there are also valuable insights for advanced developers – not least, practise at collaborating with people at different levels.

I’ve definitely gain from the two recent sessions, which have provoked interesting discussions on when to refactor, the place of design in TDD/agile and error checking in functions. None of these are advanced issues, but I reckon they are all vital for day-to-day work.

Another reason for attending is that the sessions are fun. You get to meet other developers and work with them. Collaborating with people from outside our own companies is a great way to learn new things.

March’s Brighton Java – Scala Types

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On Wednesday it was Brighton Java, where Richard Dallaway gave a preview of his QCon session,  Types working for you, not against you. Richard has spoken at Brighton Java twice before (an Introduction to Scala and Lambda Expressions in Java 8) and it was good to welcome him back.

While I don’t know Scala at all, the talk was a fascinating insight into the language. By focussing on types, the talk gave an idea of Scala’s power and flexibility. Richard described Scala as an ‘unopinionated language’, allowing for a great freedom of style. It was also interesting to learn a little about Monoids and the ways they could be used.

The talk reminded me that I really need to look into Scala more.  While I recently became excited about groovy, I found this quote from James Strachan, the language’s designer: “if someone had shown me the Programming in Scala book… back in 2003 I’d probably have never created Groovy”. Richard listed some good starting points for investigating Scala – see the threads here.

Wednesday was the first Brighton Java  meeting held at the Brandwatch HQ. We had a record number of signups, with 50 people turning up on the night. I’m pleased to see this much engagement from Brighton’s Java community.

On a personal level, I’m delighted with how Brighton Java has grown. The audience has increased massively since the first meeting back in August 2012. The ongoing support of Brandwatch and the Skiff have been fantastic. I’ve also really appreciated the help of my co-organisers Luke and James. Things have really got going since they came on board.

Now to organise our April events. Yes, for the first time we’re going to be doing two events in a month. Let’s see how this goes.

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Brighton Java – Continuous Deployment

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I had a break this month as Mr. Stanier hosted the meeting

 

Last Wednesday we had Brighton Java’s March event. It was another good turn-out, with about 35 people turning up to hear Jose Baena talk about his experience of continuous delivery.

Hearing about other people’s experiences with introducing a technology is incredibly valuable. The talk was followed by a discussion, chaired by James Stanier. We’ve not often used this format but it drew out some interesting discussion points.

Jose’s presentation was great (especially the hypnotic footage of an apple-slicing machine), with some useful suggestions on how to get Maven, Nexus, Ansible and Jenkins working together – with Jenkins acting as the driving force. There was also a detailed explanation of the importance of versioning.

The discussion underlined something I’ve been thinking about for a while – that things like continuous delivery need to be put in place early on, that these sort of infrastructural things are hard to retrofit. But that’s a story for another post.

Dan Chalmers has also posted a response to the meet-up: Continuous Deployment and Developers on-call. Dan does a good job of explaining the issues around making developers responsible for their code. I still think this is important but making it work in practise is a subtle, difficult problem.

Brighton Java – Agile Testing and Spring

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We had a packed session at Brighton Java last Wednesday, with Kim Knup from Crunch starting by discussing Agile Testing. The testing community is absolutely incredible and they’ve done so much to define their role within software development, moving it away from the unsophisticated idea of simply catching bugs.

The second talk was Luke Whiting on Micro services, micro effort. The slides and source code are now online.  I’m looking forward to playing with the tools that Brandwatch have been working with in this area.

The next Brighton Java meeting is on March 4th, with speakers to be announced nearer the time.  I don’t know who it is yet, as I’m not organising this one. I’m looking forward to being able to relax a little more on the night.