Low Inventory development

How many open tickets do you have in your tracking software?
And how many tickets were closed in the last six months?

In a lot of places I’ve worked, the relative size of these two numbers meant it would take years to clear all the open tickets. When the company has been going a long time, there are even sometimes tickets relating to issues that were fixed years before, often as the side-effect of another change.

These other tickets turn up in searches and need to be considered, if only in a small way, when new work is prioritised. While it’s useful to have long-term plans and roadmaps, I am not convinced that the ticketing system is the right place.

The more tickets you have, the more temptation there is to throw things in the backlog that need doing one day. Things get lost, and it’s hard to be certain you’re working on the most important thing.
If something is not going to get done in the next year, there’s no point tracking it.

What about bugs and live issues?
The best platforms I’ve worked on have had a zero-defect policy. If something is worth fixing, it should be fixed as soon as possible. If you’re prepared to live with it, and you’re not going to get round to fixing it any time soon… why bother recording it?

What about technical debt?
If your technical debt is causing problems, you’ll be able to figure the most important thing to focus on. The rest of those things that you might get onto next year… Still might not be a bug enough problem to actually solve next year.

Massive backlogs are a weight we don’t need to carry. Tickets you’d love to do but won’t are clutter. They’re self-delusion.

Do some new year tidying up: delete the tickets you’re not going to work on, and focus on what you actually can do.

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